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National Geographic natgeo natgeo Posts

natgeo. Photo by @renan_ozturk | Everest's north side. This three-photo carous

Photo by @renan_ozturk | Everest's north side. This three-photo carousel is made up of 26 high-resolution drone images stitched together, creating a 360 view from 27,000 feet. During the time this was captured, hundreds of humans charged for the summit in what was a very busy climbing season. We opted out to fly and search for new perspectives. Yes, the mountain tends to get crowded these days, but despite that its majesty and magnetism remain. Follow @renan_ozturk for more images from this the roof of the world. #everestmystery #onassignment

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natgeo. Photo by @iantehphotography | Ramesh, a mechanic at Gopal Motors, Port

Photo by @iantehphotography | Ramesh, a mechanic at Gopal Motors, Port Klang. I spent several days photographing around this dilapidated colonial building near Malaysia’s largest port. A major highway was built from the loading docks, bypassing this little town, with busy roads and flyovers splitting into two levels before swooping past (a few feet away) the windows and doorways of the building. The loud and heavy traffic of container trucks trundling by over the years has literally squeezed the life out of this once beautiful and historic building, now only a flicker of its former self. Only this mechanic’s garage—where I met Gopal, working late into the night servicing scooters—seemed to be doing quite well. When I left to go back to my car, I passed empty shop lots, a run-down cafe with barely a customer, followed by more boarded-up shop fronts, and finally a brothel, its dark entrance next to the charred remains of a store. As I look up at the gaping roof, I see the sky and the roots of a banyan tree growing along the walls of its crumbling interior. #malaysia #banyan #dereliction

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natgeo. Video by @lucalocatelliphoto | These cranes move enormous piles of was

Video by @lucalocatelliphoto | These cranes move enormous piles of waste inside Copenhagen’s newest waste-to-energy plant, Amager Bakke. The plant can burn through 70 tons of trash each hour—so quickly that Denmark imports household waste from Germany and the U.K. Amager Bakke produces hot water and energy for 120,000 households in the city of Copenhagen while claiming to emit nearly no pollution out of its pipes, thanks to a complex filtration system. It says it's the world’s cleanest incinerator. Does this represent a cleaner way to get rid of our waste while generating energy on our way to creating a circular economy? As a photographer engaged in technological and environmental innovation, I focus on exploring the solutions to finding new ways to live on our planet. Please follow me @lucalocatelliphoto to see more stories like this. #denmark #waste #energy #environment #lucalocatelli

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natgeo. Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown | At a stadium in Bangui, Central Af

Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown | At a stadium in Bangui, Central African Republic, in 2014, band members wait along with ministers and others for the arrival of Catherine Samba-Panza, then the republic's interim president. Despite having substantial resources such as uranium, crude oil, gold, diamonds, cobalt, lumber, and hydropower, as well as significant quantities of arable land, the Central African Republic had the lowest GDP per capita in the world in 2017.

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natgeo. Photo by Michaela Skovranova @mishkusk | Many residents of Nymboida, a

Photo by Michaela Skovranova @mishkusk | Many residents of Nymboida, a rural village in the Northern Rivers region of New South Wales, Australia, lost most of their possessions in a devastating bushfire that swept through the area on November 8. Over a month later, bushfires continue to ignite in already burned through areas. More than one million hectares have burned across New South Wales during this bushfire season, with conditions predicted to worsen as Australia heads into summer. Despite the devastation, it has been heartwarming to see the community come together and support each other. The emotional drain of the bushfires must be unfathomable. If this is any indication of what’s to come, we all need to help each other in whatever way we can. #Australia #Australianbushfires #nswfires #landscape #australia

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natgeo. Photo by @paulnicklen | The narwhal is one of the most elusive and mys

Photo by @paulnicklen | The narwhal is one of the most elusive and mysterious mammals in the Arctic. In this photo, they jockeyed for position to catch a breath of air during a polar-cod feeding frenzy. Ever since I was a kid growing up in the Canadian Arctic, I have always been fascinated by the unicorns of the sea. I had returned to the Canadian Arctic for eight years before capturing this moment. Follow me @PaulNicklen for more images that document the intimacy between wildlife and their environment. #Narwhal #Nature #Wildlifephotography #ExtinctionEndsHere

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natgeo. Photos by @nicholesobecki | Meet Karlos and Ivana, two of the lion cub

Photos by @nicholesobecki | Meet Karlos and Ivana, two of the lion cubs rescued from South Africa’s Pienika Farm in April. The cubs are slowly recuperating under the nurturing hand of University of Minnesota neurology Ph.D. candidate Jessica Burkhart, who’s in charge of the cubs’ physical therapy at Old Chapel Veterinary Clinic. Veterinarian Peter Caldwell told us that at the time of their removal, the cubs “were in severe, excruciating pain … They were screaming like little babies almost.” Ivana had been near death. Three months of around-the-clock care have helped the cubs recover, but they’ll never heal completely. For this National Geographic investigation writer @rachelfobar and I were invited to Pienika, the controversial South African lion breeding farms that also offers sport hunts—and where Karlos and Ivana were born. Follow me @nicholesobecki for updates, outtakes, and more. Story link in my bio. #lion #southafrica #fallenpride

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natgeo. Photos by @babaktafreshi | This impressive Maya temple in Tikal is cal

Photos by @babaktafreshi | This impressive Maya temple in Tikal is called the Great Jaguar, and you can hear the big cat if you spend enough time in this jungle at night. Protected in a national park in Guatemala, jaguars freely roam around the temples after dark, when tourists have departed. When I visited recently with special permission to document the site at night, the tropical sky had cleared after thunderstorms. Taurus (the bull) and the Pleiades star cluster (also known as the Seven Sisters) were rising above the 47-meter (154 feet) pyramid, which dates to 750 A.D. There are both old stories and new studies on the importance of the Pleiades to the Maya (swipe for a closer view). One myth is that the people of Tikal believed they came from Pleiades, and the seven important pyramids of the Grand Plaza in Tikal represent the pattern of Pleiades. There is no doubt that some Maya pyramids were built to reflect astronomical events, and from atop Tikal’s pyramids, perhaps ancient astronomers tracked the movements of celestial objects, keeping time for rituals and agriculture. The Maya calendar was one of the most advanced of the ancient world, thanks to astronomical observations. When Pleiades rises at sunset and is visible for the entire night in November, that’s when the dry season and harvesting begin. Tikal is one of the largest sites of Maya civilization, and at its peak was home to at least 60,000 Maya. Explore more of the world at night with me @babaktafreshi. #tikalnationalpark #saveournightsky #guatemala #maya #twanight

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natgeo. Photo by @williamodaniels | Trees in the forest of Mount Morungole in

Photo by @williamodaniels | Trees in the forest of Mount Morungole in Uganda, on the border of Kenya and South Sudan. Even at an altitude of 2,500 meters, this virgin forest has been impacted by human presence, scientists say. In 2016, as part of an assignment for the magazine, I followed a group of American and Ugandan researchers on Morungole as they undertook a biodiversity inventory of vertebrates and symbionts. Follow me on @williamodaniels for more human stories around the world.

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natgeo. Photo by @ismailferdous | A Syrian refugee family: Mohamed and Leila w

Photo by @ismailferdous | A Syrian refugee family: Mohamed and Leila with their children. The family of seven arrived in Lebanon four years ago from Syria. They live on the roof of a factory. Their oldest child and middle child suffer from cerebral palsy. #refugees #disabilities

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natgeo. Photo by @dina_litovsky | A young woman takes a selfie in Hawaii’s Vol

Photo by @dina_litovsky | A young woman takes a selfie in Hawaii’s Volcanoes National Park, just a couple feet away from free-flowing lava from Kilauea, the youngest and most active volcano on the Big Island. Volcano tourism has become a big business in the last few years, with volcanophiles traveling around the world to get as close to active volcanoes as possible. Geologists have long warned that such tours are dangerous, since most eruptions happen suddenly and without warning. For more images, follow me @dina_litovsky

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natgeo. Photo by Ivan Kashinsky @ivankphoto | Lanterns line the ceiling of Ryo

Photo by Ivan Kashinsky @ivankphoto | Lanterns line the ceiling of Ryozen-ji, a temple founded in the 8th century on the island of Shikoku, Japan. It is the first temple of an 88-temple pilgrimage. Shikoku is the smallest and least populated of Japan’s four main islands.

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natgeo. Photo by @katieorlinsky | Aliy Zirkle and her dog team are seen during

Photo by @katieorlinsky | Aliy Zirkle and her dog team are seen during the 2015 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. The Iditarod is a 1,000-mile trek across some of the world’s harshest terrain, from the wilderness of the Alaskan interior to the rugged coastal town of Nome, and is considered one of the toughest endurance races in the world. Sled dog racing, or mushing, is one of the rare professional competitive sports that is truly coed, with women competing against men on a level playing field. In the 1980s, women dominated the sport, and a famous expression was born: “Alaska: Where men are men and women win the Iditarod.” Over the past decade, the top 10 Iditarod finishes between women and men are often close to an even split, and almost always include Aliy Zirkle, one of the best and most beloved dog mushers in Alaska. I made this picture of Aliy while standing on a bridge in the village of Nenana, the first race checkpoint. It was a beautiful moment, as I watched her team run across the frozen Tanana River in perfect rhythm, with equal parts power and grace. This image is featured in the exhibition “Women a Century of Change” at the National Geographic Museum.

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natgeo. Photo by @amivitale | Veterinarians wait for a lion to wake up from it

Photo by @amivitale | Veterinarians wait for a lion to wake up from its sedation after being flown to Mozambique from South Africa and then driven to an enclosure. Twenty-four lions were moved in what was the largest conservation transport of wild lions across an international boundary in history. Decades of civil war and poaching had all but decimated the animals in this area, and careful management had brought back nearly all the other indigenous species—with the exception of these apex predators. So far all are thriving, and already over 30 cubs have been born since December. I covered this historic undertaking for my recent @natgeo story. Learn more by reading "How the world’s largest lion relocation was pulled off.” @zambezedeltaconservation @natgeoimagecollection @thephotosociety @photog.for.good @cabelafamilyfoundation #conservation #lions #savelions #stoppoaching #mozambique

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natgeo. Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto | Niko, 5, Homer, Alaska. Take a mom

Photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto | Niko, 5, Homer, Alaska. Take a moment and think back to your childhood, the era in your life when the only thing you knew about a bill was that it was a bird’s equivalent of lips, and your day job was to construct fantastical worlds with your favorite toys. In my Toy Stories series, I explore the connection between children and their toys, getting an insight into their tiny worlds and taking you on a trip down memory lane. Toy Stories is the result of a 30-month trip, in which I visited more than 50 countries and took photographs of children and their favorite toys. I would often take part in a child’s games prior to arranging the toys for the photograph. Despite some differences, I found more similarities among children living worlds apart. Even in different countries, toys had the same function, such as protecting them from dangers and things they feared in the night. Toys haven’t changed all that much since I was a kid. I’d often find the kind of toys I used to have. It was nice to go back to my childhood somehow. | Follow me @gabrielegalimbertiphoto for more photos and stories #toys #play #kids #child #children

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natgeo. Photo by @stevewinterphoto | Gir and his brother Forest were discarded

Photo by @stevewinterphoto | Gir and his brother Forest were discarded from Jeff Lowe’s Greater Wynnewood Exotic Animal Park when they grew too big for tourists to pet and take selfies with. They are li-ligers—created by crossing a lion and a tiger, then breeding that liger back to a lion. This never happens in nature. Both cubs have serious health problems caused by both crossbreeding and by poor nutrition: cubs that are handled by the public are usually taken from their mothers as newborns and fed poorly. Gir and Forest were rescued by Tiger Haven Sanctuary in Tennessee. This photo appears in our December #natgeomagazine, story on captive tigers in the US. #tigers

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natgeo. Photo by @simonnorfolkstudio I An outtake from a story about new archa

Photo by @simonnorfolkstudio I An outtake from a story about new archaeology in Jerusalem for the December issue of the magazine. Fallen columns and collapsed walls—the remains of a magnificent complex of Islamic buildings, destroyed in the earthquake of 749 C.E.—lie scattered just outside the corner of the Al Aqsa Compound in the Old City of Jerusalem. The complex was apparently constructed during the reign of the Umayyad caliph El-Walid I (705-715 C.E.) and is similar to other fortified Umayyad palaces on the fringe of the desert in historic Transjordan and Syria. But unlike those, the palace in Jerusalem–a fortified city–was not protected by towers. The Umayyad’s capital was in Damascus, but it was not realized that great importance was attached to Jerusalem, and that important religious and governmental buildings were built there. Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material. #jerusalem #archaeology #oldcityofJerusalem #AlAqsaCompound #Umayyad

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natgeo. Photo by @renan_ozturk | A feat of physical and mental strength among

Photo by @renan_ozturk | A feat of physical and mental strength among the Fisher Towers of Utah. Highline slacklining is as much an installation art form—to rig safely and without affecting the fragile landscape—as it is a sport and a lifelong practice to walk. What an honor to see Heather Larsen complete this one with style a few weeks' back. See @renan_ozturk and team for more from this moment. #slacklife #utah

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natgeo. Photo by @tasneemalsultan | Saudi Arabia ends gender segregation in re

Photo by @tasneemalsultan | Saudi Arabia ends gender segregation in restaurants after years of providing two entrances: one for women and families and another for men. This photo was taken before the announcement at one of the biggest malls in the capital city. #riyadh #saudiarabia

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natgeo. Photos by @lynseyaddario | Sunday, 29, shows the scars on his face aft

Photos by @lynseyaddario | Sunday, 29, shows the scars on his face after returning to Nigeria with other Nigerians who tried to make their way to Europe but ended up enslaved, beaten, assaulted, and trapped in Libya. Taken at a shelter in Benin City, Nigeria, March 2018. Sunday is from Benin City, and left for Europe in February 2016 after paying hundreds of dollars; he ended up in Libya for over two years, where he was bought and sold off and beaten repeatedly. During one torture session, a Libyan man set a knife on a fire and carved his cheek before he was sold off to another trafficker in Libya. The International Organisation for Migration facilitates and processes returnees in order to help them get safely back to their country of origin. Due to lack of opportunity, Nigeria is one of the major source countries of African migrants to Europe. To see more of my work, follow @lynseyaddario.

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natgeo. Photo by @jasperdoest | At the end of autumn, most female grey seals h

Photo by @jasperdoest | At the end of autumn, most female grey seals haul themselves ashore to give birth. When pups are born, the mothers spin around to sniff them and get to know their smell—to be able to find their offspring within the colony. Female grey seals are dedicated parents, spending several weeks feeding their pups and losing up to 65kg in the process. Every day the pups drink two and a half liters of milk that is so rich that the seal pups can grow by as much as 30kg in two weeks. After a month or so, females leave their pups and head back out to sea, where they feed and mate again to give birth the next year. The pups can spend up to two weeks alone on the beach as they evolve a waterproof fur, after which they take the plunge into the sea and learn to fish for themselves. Follow @jasperdoest for more images of the wonders of nature and the human-wildlife relationship. #seals #greyseal #wildlife #babyseal

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natgeo. Photo by Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski | Professional climber Sasha Digiu

Photo by Keith Ladzinski @ladzinski | Professional climber Sasha Digiulian carefully contemplates her next move on a small ledge while on-sighting a route on the sandstone cliffs of Waterval Boven, South Africa. In the climbing world, an on-sight essentially is walking up to the base of a route with no prior knowledge of it, and climbing it first try without falling or use of aided gear.

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natgeo. Photo by Acacia Johnson @acacia.johnson | On the spring sea ice, 10-ye

Photo by Acacia Johnson @acacia.johnson | On the spring sea ice, 10-year-old Horizon Willie gets a high five from her aunt, Leesie Naqitarvik, during a seal hunting trip on Canada's Baffin Island. The Inuit people lived a seminomadic hunting lifestyle here for nearly 5,000 years before settling in towns in the 1950s. As traditional life fades into memory, many families strive to preserve their cultural legacy by taking their children on long camping trips every spring, passing on traditional knowledge and skills. Leesie had traveled from her home in Ottawa to join her extended family for this important annual event. Follow me @acacia.johnson for more stories from the Arctic and beyond. #arctic #inuit #baffinisland

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natgeo. Photo by Trevor Frost @tbfrost | Face-to-face with a saltwater crocodi

Photo by Trevor Frost @tbfrost | Face-to-face with a saltwater crocodile, the world's largest reptile, on the Adelaide River in Australia, where crocodiles are known for jumping out of the water to grab chickens dangled from poles for tourists. To see more animal imagery, head over to @tbfrost

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